What you may not know

There are other additions to Safari, of course. We covered some - including the ability to resize text entry boxes and rearrange tabs via drag-and-drop - in this video preview from June. Apple touts other features in the Safari section of its Leopard preview; these changes include Preview controls for PDFs built directly into Safari and the ability to turn any photo you find on the Web into your Desktop picture with just a click.

But again, Safari 3.0 has been out in the wild in beta form for four months now - apart from the now-operational ability to create Web Clips, there's little undiscovered territory here.

What we think

Safari 3.0 works as well as Safari 2.0, and its new features further enhance the browsing experience. Once you've used the enhanced find - which you'll notice in other OS X applications as well - there's no going back to the old style. Matches are easy to spot, and it's simple to jump from one match to the next. Creating your own Web Clips is useful as well, although it would be much more so if you could permanently store your creations. The warnings about closing multiple tabs and forms with text on them are welcome, as is the ability to have your history file erase over time.

Safari 2.0 users should enjoy Safari 3.0 even more. The improvements make an already very good browser that much better. If you use Firefox or any of the myriad other OS X browsers, you'll have to decide if the ability to create your own Dashboard widgets from web pages is a compelling reason to switch over to Safari - most of this browser's other new features can be found in many other browsers.

OUR VERDICT

Those making the move to OS X 10.5 who weren't running Safari 3.0 Public Beta will find many new features to like in the OS's default browser. It's still fast, and the new usability features make it that much better. Great.