Nvidia's GPU Tech Conference is evolving to have an even stronger emphasis on high performance computing than the past couple of years. Yes, there are token nods towards the consumer side of the business, Cyberlink is at the show demoing 3D Blu-ray, but that's about it. PNY is here, but showing its Tesla and Quadro based professional solutions.

If you're into high performance computing, there's some impressive stuff to be seen. As you wander around the show, there are a number of poster sessions which show off some of the research and high performance computing apps being created using GPU compute techniques like CUDA and OpenCL. Here are a just a few titles:

  • Black Holes in Galactic Nuclei simulated with Large GPU clusters in CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences)
  • Real Time Ultrasound Data Processing for Regional Anesthesia Guidance (Duke University Department of Biomedical Engineering)
  • Exploring Recognition Network Representations for Efficient Speech Inference on the GPU (Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, UC Berkeley)

Even the papers leaning towards more practical uses tend to seem academic. Take, for example, "GPU Accelerated Markerless Motion Capture." This is a Stanford University project that addresses how to accurately capture real life motion of humans and animals without having to attach pesky, reflective markers. This is useful in animation and movie making, but could also prove useful in surveillance applications, but it sure sounded dry.

Similarly, "Real-Time Particle Simulation in the Blender Game Engine with OpenCL" is from Florida State University, but it's really aimed at people learning techniques for building more realistic games.

It's clear that Nvidia's emphasis for the GPU Tech Conference is on the "tech" in the title. Unlike the Intel Developer Forum, which is more targeted at building the entire ecosystem for all Intel products, the core emphasis at GPU Tech Conference is on high performance computing.

Wandering around the San Jose Convention Centre show floor, the exhibits tended towards high performance computing applications and hardware as well. The MicroWay WhisperQuiet Tesla Personal Supercomputer was pretty much the average system on the floor:

MicroWay WhisperQuiet Tesla Personal Supercomputer

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