Driverless cars: 11 questions the insurance industry must answer

Christina Mercer
Christina Mercer

Christina Mercer

Christina is audience development editor. After graduating from the University of Nottingham reading philosophy and theology in 2013, Christina joined a tech start-up specialising in mobile apps. She has a keen interest in the mobile platform and innovative tech.

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For some car manufacturers, the future of driving centres on autonomous or 'driverless' vehicles, with some major companies like Volvo already making big strides in the production and roll-out of connected, autonomous cars.

Last month, Volvo launched 'Drive Me UK', an extensive UK-based autonomous driving trial, involving up to 100 driverless cars being driven on real roads by real people in 2017. 

And with tech giants such as Elon Musk claiming all Tesla cars will be fully driverless in two years, manufacturers, insurers and government bodies must provide changes in policy, establish regulations and answer the all important question: who is liable if an accident was to occur?

Head of autonomous and connected vehicle research at Ageas, Tim Marlow says: "What we have, in terms of the current system, which is a tort-based system [a civil action taken by one person against another in court], will almost certainly have to evolve.

"In terms of when an autonomous vehicle is involved in an accident, we would need to understand exactly the extent to which any blame may be assigned to that vehicle or whether blame may be assigned to the driver," he adds.  

With that in mind, Techworld has 11 questions the insurance industry must answer...

Read next: 11 unexpected ways driverless cars will change Britain forever and The great driverless car race: Where will the UK place?

UK Tech Weekly Podcast: Driverless Cars 

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