Sun has launched a half-terabyte drive complete with built-in encryption and the ability to move data at 120MB/sec.

Titanium is the development name for the T10000, the next generation in StorageTek's 9940 line. The existing 9940B holds 200GB of data and moves it at 40MB/sec. Why the name change from the expected 9940C? Dave Kenyon, enterprise tape automation director for Sun's Data Management Group, said: "Titanium, the T10000, is fundamentally different from any other capacity drive we've built. It's designed to work in concert with and behind disk."

Kenyon sees a different usage pattern occurring with this tape. Customers tape automation assets are not in the drive but in the media. A single Titanium tape can hold several disk's worth of data. Customers will tend to keep the media for longer.

Kenyon said that the next Titanium generation's heads and electronics are already designed. It will take raw capacity to 1TB. But it won't necessarily be released in the industry average of two years after the preceding generation.

Competing drives, apart from Sony's SAIT, fall short in both capacity and data transfer terms.

IBM's TS1120 can hold up to 500GB and runs at 100MB/sec, almost matching Titanium's basic specification. The LTO 3 drive holds 400GB and also runs at 40MB/sec. LTO 4 is forecast to hold 800GB and transfer data at 120MB/sec. But it may not appear for another twelve months.

Quantum's SDLT 600 holds 300GB of raw data and accesses it at 32MB/sec. A forthcoming SDLT 1200 will hold 600GB of raw data. It is at least several months away from release. Sony's SAIT 2 holds 1TB already and transfers data at 60MB/sec.

Sony's SAIT only has a small share of the market and competes in the open Unix/Wintel server market with LTO and SDLT, not with Titanium. The dominant and growing open systems format by far is LTO.

In the mainframe or enterprise tape market the there are only two players: IBM and Sun. With Titanium Sun has edged past IBM's TS1120 in terms of I/O speed and encryption capability.

The large-scale Sun StreamLine8500 and Powderhorn 9310 libraries support Titanium. Support will also be extended to the mid-range L700, L1400 and L180 libraries. No pricing and availability information was supplied.

Titanium is the development name for the T10000, the next generation in StorageTek's 9940 line. The existing 9940B holds 200GB of data and moves it at 40MB/sec. Why the name change from the expected 9940C? Don Kenyon, enterprise tape automation director for Sun's Data Management Group, said: "Titanium, the T10000, is fundamentally different from any other capacity drive we've built. It's designed to work in concert with and behind disk."

Kenyon sees a different usage pattern occurring with this tape. Customers tape automation assets are not in the drive but in the media. A single Titanium tape can hold several disk's worth of data. Customers will tend to keep the media for longer.

Kenyon said that the next Titanium generation's heads and electronics are already designed. It will take raw capacity to 1TB. But it won't necessarily be released in the industry average of two years after the preceding generation.

Competing drives, apart from Sony's SAIT, fall short in both capacity and data transfer terms.

- IBM's TS1120 can hold up to 500GB and runs at 100MB/sec, almost matching Titanium's basic specification.
- The LTO 3 drive holds 400GB and also runs at 40MB/sec. LTO 4 is forecast to hold 800GB and transfer data at 120MB/sec. But it may not appear for another twelve months.
- Quantum's SDLT 600 holds 300GB of raw data and accesses it at 32MB/sec. A forthcoming SDLT 1200 will hold 600GB of raw data. It is at least several months away from release.
- Sony's SAIT 2 holds 1TB already and transfers data at 60MB/sec.

Sony's SAIT only has a small share of the market and competes in the open Unix/Wintel server market with LTO and SDLT, not with Titanium. The dominant and growing open systems format by far is LTO.

In the mainframe or enterprise tape market the there are only two players; IBM and Sun. With Titanium Sun has edged past IBM's TS1120 in terms of I/O speed and encryption capability.

The large-scale Sun StreamLine8500 and Powderhorn 9310 libraries support Titanium. Support will also be extended to the mid-range L700, L1400 and L180 libraries. No pricing and availability information was supplied.