A storage virtualisation startup that takes standard PCs and adds their disk space to a virtual storage-pool is in beta mode and planning a product release in the third quarter.

Kapsean makes software called iSCUBE, which consists of a Linux-based storage server operating system that takes disks from multiple x86 PCs, aggregates the storage and allows administrators to move storage units across such devices as Windows servers, desktops and notebooks, said Roger Gaudet, Kapsean's vice president of engineering and chief architect.

"Each [x86] node can be deployed by simply plugging it into the network, and multiple nodes will auto-discover each other to form a single pool of storage," Kapsean stated in a press release.

"By installing a Windows-based application on a client PC, users can auto-configure a personal, formatted virtual disk-drive with one click." Kapsean's technology can be used to add secondary storage to Windows desktops and laptops, clone system disks for disaster recovery, and deliver fault-tolerant disk space to Windows servers, the company stated.

Based in Sudbury, Massachusetts, Kapsean was founded four years ago but just came out of stealth mode at CES in January and exhibited at Interop Las Vegas this week.

The start-up is taking beta applications now and is planning a general release for early in the third quarter, Gaudet said.

Pricing will start at around $50 per seat, he said.