Dell has announced a new microserver, the PowerEdge C5220, with Intel's first Xeon server processors based on the Ivy Bridge microarchitecture, which has not been officially announced by the chip maker yet.

The PowerEdge C5220 is one of the first servers with Xeon chips based on the Ivy Bridge microarchitecture. The server is targeted at web 2.0, cloud and high-performance applications, Dell said revealed.

The server runs on Intel's Xeon E3-1200 V2 series processors, which are faster and more power-efficient than previous E3 chips based on the Sandy Bridge microarchitecture.

An Intel spokesman said the new chips provide more performance-per-watt, and a server with E3-1200 V2 processors drawing 17 watts of power in a 3U rack space could provide 53% more performance than a 20-watt Sandy Bridge Xeon CPU.

The Xeon E3-1200 V2 chips draw between 17 watts and 45 watt of power, Dell said. The new Xeon E3-1200 V2 chips are made using the 22-nanometer process and include 3D transistors, which are faster and more power-efficient than 2D transistors found in existing 32-nm process chips.

Intel could not share further information about the new Xeon processors. Intel in April said that it would release its first Xeon server chips based on the Ivy Bridge microarchitecture later this quarter, which would be targeted at microservers. Microservers are low-power servers with shared components designed mainly for web serving and cloud applications.

The PowerEdge C5220 can scale performance while reducing the number of servers in a data centre. Dell said. The server marker said the new microservers helped one company consolidate four servers into one while running a software infrastructure based on the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP software) stack.

The microserver will become available on May 22 starting at $12,210 (£7,560), Dell said.