Think of any billion dollar Silicon Valley tech company and chances are they will have an office in Dublin, Ireland.

Google, Twitter, Facebook, Paypal and LinkedIn all have offices in the Irish capital and today yet another fast-growing US firm announced it has opened an office there, possibly to take advantage of Ireland’s low corporate tax rate of 12.5 percent, nearly half as much as the UK rate of 20 percent.  

Dublin's so-called Silicon Docks are already home to Facebook and Twitter offices ©Flickr/Angelo Failla

DocuSign, a San Francisco-based company whose software allows businesses to sign documents electronically, said it is opening the office in Dublin to support its expansion efforts in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. 

DocuSign said it will hire up to 100 staff in the new office across sales and technical support roles, adding that it considers Dublin a key market for tech talent. 

Leading the office launch are Irishmen Ronan Copeland, Saul Whitton and Eoin Hinchy.

“The team and I will be driving DocuSign’s expansion locally and across EMEA, providing sales and technical support to help our customers and partners achieve their digital transformations with DocuSign,” said Copeland.

Hinchy told Techworld: "We’ve got the kinds of universities in Dublin who are willing to take input from industry and allow us to shape the graduates we bring inside."

He added that Ireland's low corporation tax is "conducive" to multinationals moving to Dublin but not a primary reason for most.

DocuSign said the move will enable it to provide local sales and technical support to its growing customer base in Ireland, which includes Three Ireland, Solgari, Gap Partnership and Future Finance.

DocuSign has raised more than $230 million to date from investors including Google Ventures, Accel Partners, Comcast Ventures and Kleiner Perkins.

The company claims to have surpassed 50 million users worldwide and 100,000 customers. 

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