Blizzard Entertainment has taken legal action against the programmers of cheat and hack software for StarCraft 2: Wings of Liberty, GameSpot reported today.

According to GameSpot, the lawsuit, filed the United States District Court, Central District in Los Angeles last week, accuses three programmers of creating and selling cheat and hack programs for StarCraft II, which is a violation of the end user licence agreement players agree to when they install the game, along with the terms of use for and existing copyright law.

Blizzard seeks damages and "disgorgement" of any profits from the sale of the hacks, reports GameSpot, naming the hackers that go by online pseudonyms "Permaphrost" and "Cranix" from Canada and "Linuxawesome" from Peru.

Blizzard declined to comment, saying the publisher doesn't comment on legal matters, but a Blizzard spokesperson did point out one such case the StarCraft publisher won in the past. In a countersuit filed against MDY Industries, a US district court judge ruled in favor of Blizzard (aka "The Glider" case, a suit about the Gilder bot program that ran World of Warcraft, Blizzard says, with "little or no player input").

In the countersuit (MDY sued Blizzard in 2006 asking the court to allow Gilder to operate), Blizzard cited unlawful use of intellectual property, violation of the terms of use and Digital Millennium Copyright Act violations. The court ruled in 2008 in a summary judgment against MDY on copyright infringement and unlawful interference with Blizzard's business and was ordered to pay $6 million pending appeal. In the 2009 trial, the court ruled that MDY violated the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.