The self-styled campaigners who launched DDoS attacks on a range of prominent copyright and anti-piracy organisations last week have threatened further attacks in an interview with security company, Panda Security.

In recent weeks, the group, ‘anonymous’ has launched a rolling series of 'payback' DDoS strikes against organisations as diverse as the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the British Phonographic Industry [BPI], and the Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft [AFACT].

The same group is also connected to attacks on the controversial ACS: Law solicitors which has been working for organisations chasing file sharers, and which was last week struck by a data leak that saw 5,000 alleged porn sharers’ names published on the Internet.

The group might also be connected to attacks on the Church of Scientology, and the UK’s music group, The Ministry of Sound, which was hit by a DDoS in recent days.

The apparently genuine interview conducted by PandaLabs connects these attacks with the nororious ‘4chan’ image message board in a loose way, but makes clear the group’s loose affiliations.

“We manifest as Anarchy. We are comprised of people from all walks of life. In short, we feel strongly motivated to do what we can to fight back against things which are morally questionable,” says the anonymous representative.

 “Their [industry organisation’s] long outdated traditional views on copyright infringement enforced solely by rich and powerful corporations need to be modified in light of the modern age on the Internet, the Information Age,” continues the interviewee.

Guerilla DDoS attacks are an everyday part of the Internet, so much so that most go unreported. However, what made the attacks stand out has been there scale and success, causing hours of downtime at some of the affected organisations.

“There is no time frame. We will keep going until we stop being angry,” says the ‘anonymous’ representative in the interview.

What seems to have set off the attacks were the recent raids on European file-sharing websites, part of a long-running and ongoing campaign.

The conflict between organisations acting on behalf of copyright holders and the ingrained and idealistic sharing culture that has established itself on the Internet, looks like becoming a long term struggle.