A tiny Israeli security firm so early-stage it has yet to even emerge from stealth mode has been snapped up by the country’s tech giant Check Point for a reported $80 million (£52 million).

Called Hyperwise, the firm’s speciality since founding in 2014 is what it describes as ‘CPU level Threat Prevention’, a sandboxing system that aims to stop malware infection at a low level before it executes.

Neither firm went into much detail about how this technology might be integrated into current systems but Check Point said it planned to add it to its current low-level threat emulation systems used to check and quarantine suspicious files.

It sounds vague but is part of a more general attempt to bolster the collapsing wall of anti-virus protection with something that monitors PC security at a lower level, right down to chip level if necessary. With the NSA now said to have found a way of reaching even the firmware chips on hard drives, this is a the sort of low-level tech that will become important in the next five years.

“Security technology innovation needs to outpace threat innovation,” said Check Point CEO, Gil Shwed.  “The acquisition of Hyperwise brings important technology and deep expertise that will extend Check Point’s threat prevention leadership.

“As we integrate the next generation OS and CPU level threat protection into our Threat Emulation offering, Check Point bolsters customers’  cyber defense strategies to identify and stop the broadest range of attacks at the first point of contact.“

Clearly, Check Point is not buying market share or revenue with such an early-stage entity but does get its hands on its intellectual property and development team – in that sense Hyperwise has been a sort of elaborate job application for its staff, one that has paid off handsomely.

A moving force behind Hyperwise’s early funding was Check Point co-founder Schlomo Kramer, now the CEO of Imperva, who contributed its $2 million funding round a year ago along with former Imperva executive, Miki Boodaei, who went on to founded IBM acquisition, Trusteer.

The size of the deal is unconfirmed but was quoted by an Israeli newspaper as being $80 million which if true would make it an extraordinary exit by a company not even on the market.

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