Steve Jobs’ assault against Google Android was just some “differences” created “for show”, according to Google CEO Larry Page.

“I think that served their interests,” Page told Bloomberg Businessweek. “For a lot of companies, it’s useful for them to feel like they have an obvious competitor and to rally around that. I believe that it’s better to shoot higher. You don’t want to be looking at your competitors. You want to be looking at what’s possible and how to make the world better.”

His casual comments have sparked controversy on the web.

“Google CEO Larry Page apparently is trying to rewrite history,” charged Brent Dirks, at AppAdvice.com.

One of the most startling parts of Steve Jobs’ authorised biography last year was the extent and depth of his rage at Android, and by extension, its main creator and chief advocate, Google.

“I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple's $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong,” Jobs said, according to the book Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson. “I'm going to destroy Android, because it's a stolen product. I'm willing to go thermonuclear war on this.”

Jobs’ conviction seems to have been, and so far remains, the driving force behind Apple’s stubborn, persistent and expensive patent battles with Android handset makers, on multiple continents.

In the most recent ruling in one US case this week, a federal judge rejected arguments by Motorola, and upheld Apple’s patent claims for touchscreen technology that interprets the user's touchscreen commands by recognising swipes that are not straight lines.

“Disaster” fits more with Jobs’ vow of going thermonuclear on Android than with Page’s “differences,” however.