AMD has declined to comment on a Taiwanese media report that more than 1 million re-marked processors may have been shipped to Germany and China.

Processors that are re-marked as a more valuable model, such as one offering more on-chip cache or a higher clock speed, can be sold at a premium to unsuspecting users, who may find themselves saddled with a defective processor or one that does not perform to the expected specifications.

AMD is preparing an official statement on this matter and that statement is expected to be released on Wednesday, said Amanda Lin, an AMD spokeswoman in Taipei. Lin declined to comment further on the matter.

Lin also declined to comment on a report that Taiwanese police had seized 60,000 defective AMD processors from a suspected re-marking operation in the southern city of Tainan . That report claimed AMD officials in Taiwan had confirmed the seizure, but Lin said this report was "a mistake." AMD had not confirmed any such seizure, she said.

The reported seizure of defective AMD chips will also be addressed in the official statement expected to be released on Wednesday, she said.