Inventor of the World Wide Web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, has revealed details of a new project that unites fierce tech rivals Apple, Google and Facebook to work on the development of HTML5.

Dubbed WebPlatforms.org, the site aims to provide a central place for developers to keep up to date with changes to the web platform.

An online blog says: “Great sites appear, covering one or two subjects, but too often fail to keep up with the rapid pace of changes to the web platform.

“This may have been good enough when the web was just simple HTML, basic CSS, and maybe a little JavaScript, but that was a long time ago. Today’s web is more than just documents, it’s applications and multimedia, and it’s changing at a breakneck pace.”

WebPlatform.org aims to work as an accurate reference guide with tutorials for every part of client-side development and design, with in-depth indicators of browser support and links to tests for specific features.

Visitors to the site will be able to have an API to access the structured information for reuse and will be able to experiment with and share code.

“It will have resources for teachers to help them train students with critical skills. It will have information you just can’t get anywhere else, and it will have it all in one place,” says the blog.

‘Stewards’ of the site, organisations deemed as influencers on the web, include Apple, Facebook, Google, Adobe, HP, Microsoft, Mozilla, Nokia and Opera. However, it is headed up by the World Wide Web Consortium, which is Berners-Lee’s international community that works on web standards.

The blog says: “The stewards, those organisations who have put so much into this so far, are going to keep putting people, content, money, and effort into the site. But they are doing so as peers, with the same privileges available to anyone else who builds up trust and becomes a site admin.”

There is one sticking point though. The site is still in alpha release and Berners-Lee recognises that it doesn’t yet provide the resources that it aims to in the future.

“There is much to do, and we think that the best way to achieve our goal of comprehensive, up-to-date, and useful site is to enable the entire community to shape it, to meet our needs together,” says the blog.

“So in the spirit of ‘release early, release often’, we decided to announce the site at the earliest possible point, and improve it in public…with the web community.”