Wireless broadband got a boost in Europe yesterday when the European Parliament voted in favour of the Radio Spectrum Policy Programme, which will reallocate radio spectrum frequencies.

The RSPP guidelines have been drawn up by the European Commission. Although the allocation of radio frequencies is a matter for national authorities, member states have approved the new rules in order to further the digital single market, a unified market for all digital services across Europe.

According to the deal, the 800MHz band, currently used for analogue TV, should be made available for wireless broadband services in all European Union countries by January 2013. This so called "digital dividend" will become available as TV across Europe goes digital. According to the Commission, this will help to accommodate "exponential growth in the use of wireless broadband services." One of the main objectives is also to cover sparsely populated areas.

"The RSPP will optimise the use of frequencies to the benefit of all users of smartphones and other mobile digital platforms," said Gunnar Hökmark, the Swedish parliamentarian who steered the legislation through Parliament.

RSPP will allow sufficient spectrum to be made available for services such as high-speed 4G wireless broadband, mobile TV, wireless electronic books, transport systems, civil protection, smart energy grids and smart metering systems.

At Parliament's request, at least 1200MHz should also be allocated to mobile data traffic by 2015. Furthermore, the Commission will also assess whether there is a need to harmonise additional spectrum bands in the 400MHz to 6GHz range in order to manage the exponential growth in wireless data traffic.

The European wireless electronic communications industry supports an estimated 3.5 million jobs, generates 2.5% of Gross Domestic Product and represents about €250 billion (£328 billion) of economic activity each year in Europe.