Data centre managers looking to reduce their power costs are being offered a chance to ditch their energy-efficient servers thanks to a new initiative from VeryPC.

The server company, which claims that its servers are at least 50 percent more energy efficient than any of its competitors, is inviting organisations with data centres to trade-in their existing servers for VeryPC's energy efficient Janus 2 server.

What the customer will be left to pay is the average electricity cost savings per month. "Take the example of real customer," said VeryPC's managing director Peter Hopton. "They had 117 HP DL145s, each producing on average about 272W. We replaced them with our Janus II, 8-core machines producing about 146W at peak power. What they have to pay us is the average electricity bill saving, so they're getting a complete system refresh at net cost."

He added that there could be additional cost savings as companies could reduce the cost of their cooling system and the scheme could also help companies looking to reduce capital expenditure as there's zero cap-ex cost.

However, the VeryPC programme works by taking a nationwide tariff (a four-year tariff from British Gas) which might not the same as the customer's own tariff. Hopton conceded that customers could end up paying slightly more under the scheme but said that in most cases, the users were on a rate that was coming to an end. "We'd like to work in real savings but it's usually impossible to extract the true power consumption of a data centre so we work on a nationwide scheme to be fair to everyone."

Hopton said that he expected to see particular interest from the London region where there's a particular problem with data centre capacity. "We call it the M25 issue: firms there have trouble with real estate, electricity and cooling, so we're sure to see some enquiries from there."

VeryPC has a list of about 150 servers that it would accept in trade-in, Hopton is confident that the company's own machines would be more energy efficient than any of the competitors. "I'm aware that just about every server manufacturer has claimed that its products are the most energy-efficient out there but, as far as I know, none of them has published their wattage to prove it. We're happy to publish ours."

Customers interested in the scheme have 90 days to send their old servers in. Hopton said that in keeping with the green message the company would reuse and recycle as much of the old servers as it could.