The country of Malaysia has announced plans to move 10 million students, teachers and parents to Google Apps, as part of a national plan to reform the country’s educational system.

As part of the initiative, the country is also deploying Google Chromebooks to primary and secondary schools nationwide.

Google Apps allows students to work together on projects by sharing and collaborating on documents, spread sheets and presentations. As all documents are stored in the cloud, and accessed via the internet, teachers are able to feedback directly into documents and suggest improvements.

By giving students access to Chromebooks, teachers can also make lessons more fun and engaging and give pupils fast and secure access to the online information they need to conduct research, according to Google.

“To deploy technology across a nationwide school system, computers need to be simple, manageable and secure. Chromebooks are ideal for learning and sharing in the classroom – there’s nothing complicated to learn, they boot up in seconds and have virus protection built in,” said Felix Lin, director of product management at Google in a blog post.

“They also offer easy setup and deployment, which means they’re ready to go the moment a student opens the lid and logs in. And with reduced overhead costs, Chromebooks are a cost-efficient option to deploy technology at scale.”

A recent report by research firm IDC, sponsored by Google, found that Chromebooks yield three-year cost of ownership savings of $1,135 (£737) per device compared to traditional PCs or tablets, require 69 percent fewer hours to deploy and 92 percent fewer hours to manage.

To date, more than 3,000 schools worldwide have deployed Chromebooks, from Edina, Minnesota to Point England, New Zealand. The Philippines has also “Gone Google” with the country's Department of Education moving its systems to the cloud with Google Apps for Education.

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